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Every Day is Earth Day

Earth Day began in 1970 as a time for people across the nation to learn about the environment and take action to protect it. In April 2020, Earth Day will turn 50. Because environmental stewardship is a priority for University of Richmond, we won't be celebrating a single day. Instead, we will celebrate Earth Day for the entire year! During the 2019-2020 academic year, we challenge you to live like Every Day is Earth Day. 

Reduce your impact, learn about sustainability, rethink waste, get out in nature, or volunteer with a local nonprofit. University of Richmond takes sustainability seriously, that's why we have big goals like achieving carbon neutrality by 2050 or diverting 75% of our waste from the landfill by 2025. However, we know that sustainability demands individual efforts along with institutional change. Check out ways to get involved and events across campus that you can attend listed below. Share your efforts with #UREarthDay and tag @beagreenspider. 

Facts, Events, and Opportunities to Get Involved

September 10: Intro to Sustainability

Hosted by URSA and the Office for Sustainability
September 10
7:30-8:30
THC 348

You're invited to learn about sustainability at a global, campus, and individual level. Get to know exactly what UR is doing to reduce waste, promote a healthy environment, conserve energy, and educate our campus. This will also be a time for you to ask any sustainability questions you may have. 

September 12: Planting Party

Hosted by The Chaplaincy and the Office for Sustainability
September 12
7:00
Wilton Center Multifaith Room

Pick out a plant, decorate the pot, and practice some mindfulness as we come together to consider all that plants do for us and how we relate to nature. 

September 13: CCE Brown Bag: Not Just Spiders: Insects of Richmond

Hosted by the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement
September 13
12:30-1:25
THC 305

Panelists: Dr. Art Evans, Kirstin Berben, Robert Ostrom

Location: Tyler Haynes Commons, Room 305

The Bonner Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) hosts weekly Brown Bag discussions, open to members of the campus and the community, from 12:30–1:25p.m. on most Fridays during the academic year. Each week, a speaker or small panel leads a presentation on a provocative social issue, then opens up the floor for discussion. Free pizza will be provided.

Join us for "Not Just Spiders: Insects of Richmond," a conversation on native insects in Richmond. Our panel includes campus and community members including entomologist Dr. Art Evans, student reseacher Robert Ostrom, and campus beekeeper Kirstin Berben.

September 17: Global Environment Speaker Series: Non-Market Valuation and Uncertainty in the Analysis of Environmental Policy

Hosted by the Environmental Studies Program
September 17
4:30
International Center Commons

Alex Marten
Economist, National Center for Environmental Economics, US Environmental Protection Agency
"Non-Market Valuation and Uncertainty in the Analysis of Environmental Policy"

September 20: CCE Brown Bag: Coffee is Everything: A Conversation with Campus Food Leaders

Hosted by the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement
September 20
12:30-1:25
THC 305

Join us for "Coffee is Everything: A Conversation with Campus Food Leaders," a flavorful discussion on the story of coffee at the University of Richmond. Our panel includes campus and community members including Retail Services assistant director Maya Vincelli, UR alum and coffee entrepreneur David Blanchard, and Dining Services purchasing director Josh Wroniewicz. Free coffee samples included!

September 21: SpidersEngage Day of Service at Huguenot Flatwater

Hosted by the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement
September 21
9:00-1:00
Register here

September 22: Spirituality and Sustainability Dinner and Discussion

Hosted by the Office of the Chaplaincy
September 22
6:30
The Savory Grain

Attendees will share a meal at The Savory Grain, a local Richmond restaurant, and enjoy conversation with UR's own Maya Vincelli as they discuss the intersection of spirituality and sustainability.

September 25: Anthropocene: The Human Epoch

Presented by VMAP, Museums, Del McWhorter the Department of Geography and the Environment
September 25
5:00-7:00
Adams Auditorium 205
Boatwright Library

Anthropocene: The Human Epoch is a years-in-the-making feature documentary from the award-winning team behind Manufactured Landscapes (2006) and Watermark (2013) and narrated by Alicia Vikander. The film follows the research of an international body of scientists, the Anthropocene Working Group which, after nearly 10 years of research, argues that as a result of profound and lasting human changes to the Earth, the Holocene Epoch gave way in the mid-twentieth century to what they call the Anthropocene Epoch.

From concrete seawalls in China that now cover 60% of the mainland coast, to the biggest terrestrial machines ever built in Germany, to psychedelic potash mines in Russia's Ural Mountains, to metal festivals in the closed city of Norilsk, to the devastated Great Barrier Reef in Australia and massive marble quarries in Carrara, the filmmakers have traversed the globe using state of the art camera techniques to document the evidence and experience of human planetary domination. At the intersection of art and science, Anthropocene makes the case for that we are witnessing a critical moment in geological history -- and brings a provocative and unforgettable experience of our species's breadth and impact.

September 26: Paris to Pittsburgh

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability and the Office of the Chaplaincy
September 26
Organizations Tabling: 6:00-7:00
Film Screening: 7:00-8:30
Ukrop Auditorium

Climate change is a serious, urgent issue. You're invited to learn more about it and how you can respond. Join us for a free screening of "Paris to Pittsburgh", a film following how people are demanding and developing real solutions in the face of climate change across America. Prior to the film, student groups and nonprofit organizations will be tabling so you can get to know more about efforts to respond to climate change on campus and in Virginia. 

October 1: Intro to Sustainability

Hosted by URSA and the Office for Sustainability
October 1
7:30-8:30
THC 346

You're invited to learn about sustainability at a global, campus, and individual level. Get to know exactly what UR is doing to reduce waste, promote a healthy environment, conserve energy, and educate our campus. This will also be a time for you to ask any sustainability questions you may have. 

October 3: Consider This: Spirituality & Sustainability

Hosted by the Office of the Chaplaincy
October 3
6:30-8:00
UR Downtown

A dinner series where participants gather to consider life's big questions, discussing spirituality, religion and what it means to live as people with or without a professed faith tradition. Faculty, staff, students, and alumni are invited to participate in each dinner. It is a time to be community, engage in meaningful conversation, and consider the beliefs and commitments at the heart of our work here at the University of Richmond.

October 4: The SEEDS Project Info Session

Hosted by The SEEDS Project
October 4
1:30
THC 310

The SEEDS Project (Students Engaging in and Enacting a Dialogue on Service) is UR’s student-run alternate spring break organization. The three spring breaks to Louisiana, West Virginia, and Michigan are great ways to engage in meaningful service while gaining an entirely new perspective of the region you are in and the communities you work alongside - not to mention a fantastic way to get to know a diverse group of people from UR!

Come learn more about the organization at our final info session on October 4th, at 1:30pm in THC 310. Filling out an application is in no way a commitment; once decisions are released (right before Thanksgiving break) you will have a chance to accept or decline your offer. If you have any interest in SEEDS or don’t have spring break plans yet, we encourage you to apply!

Our application deadline is October 15th at 11:59 pm.

Find the application here or check out our website.

If you have any questions, please email theseedsproject.info@gmail.com

October 6: National Solar Tour

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability and Family Weekend
October 6
12:00-3:00
Robins Center

UR is joining organizations across the country for the 2019 National Solar Tour. Join us any time between 12:00 noon and 3:00 p.m. for a tour of the Weinstein Center's solar array. Participants will get an overview of how solar works, what is unique about our solar array, and why this array is important for the University's sustainability goals.

Parking is available in lot C61, behind the Robins Center. To reach the solar array, follow the signs up the external stairs on the south side of the Robins Center (next to the Weinstein Center for Recreation entrance). For a handicap accessible entrance, please park in lot C66, enter the Robins Center through the President's Circle entrance, and follow the signs to the array. 

October 12: Fall Break in RVA: Farmer's Market

Hosted by the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement
October 12
10:00-1:00
Register Here

Are you a fan of crisp outdoor weather, food trucks, slow grown sausage, and freshly glazed donuts? The Center for Civic Engagement has planned a morning at South of the James Farmer's Market on Saturday, October 12, from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. If you are interested in this opportunity, we encourage you to sign up in SpidersEngage to reserve transportation.

October 18: Global Climate Change Week Talks

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability
October 18
10:00-12:00
THC 321, 346, and 348
Register here

The climate is changing and the effects, from extreme weather events to biodiversity loss, can feel difficult to comprehend and respond to. As part of Global Climate Change Week, we invite you to learn about what it means that the climate is changing, along with ways that you can take action. Rob Andrejewski, the Director of Sustainability, will lead an hour-long main session about climate change and the impact it's having. Coffee and bagels will be available. After that, attendees can choose from two different breakout sessions on Environmental Activism and Going Solar led by UR Faculty and Staff. Registration is required

October 19: Rethink Waste: Spiders Go Green Football

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability and Athletics
October 19
6:00
Robins Stadium
Sign up to volunteer

Join us for the third annual Spiders Go Green football game! As part of UR's Rethink Waste initiative, this game will feature composting and increased recycling. Attend to cheer on the Spiders as they face the Yale Bulldogs, or volunteer to help educate game attendees on what can be composted and recycled. Last year we diverted 55% of the game's waste from the landfill, and this year we want to do even better. 

Volunteers are crucial to the success of this event and it is a great opportunity to get service hours! All volunteers will recieve a meal voucher and t-shirt. Sign up here

October 22: Global Environment Speaker Series: Plant Feeling in the Anthropocene

Hosted by the Department of Geography and the Environment
October 22
4:30
Gottwald Auditorium

Mary Kuhn
Assistant Professor, English and Program in Environmental Thought & Practice, University of Virginia

October 24: Unsettling Ecologies Lecture Series: Melville's Anthropocenes

Hosted by the English Department, the Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies program, and the Environmental Studies program
October 24
5:00
Brown Alley Room, Weinstein Hall

Dana Luciano
Associate Professor of English and Women's & Gender Studies, Rutgers University

The 2019-20 lecture series highlights some of the most provocative interdisciplinary work being done in the environmental humanities. The title of the series —Unsettling Ecologies—invites us
to ask at least three questions:
1. How does a focus on ecology unsettle traditional ideas of personhood, politics, and ethical living?
2. How does mainstream ecological thought need to be unsettled by more radical ideas about how we may survive climate catastrophe?
3. How does thinking seriously about ecology require us to grapple with the colonial projects that animate almost all the pernicious environmental problems we face?

Learn more about the series

October 24: Cowspiracy Screening & Vegan Panel Discussion

Hosted by Eve Gilles and Green UR
October 24
7:00-8:30
Westhampton Deanery

Come watch "Cowspiracy" to learn about the impact that animal agriculture has on the environment. 

November 5: Intro to Sustainability

Hosted by URSA and the Office for Sustainability
November 5
7:30-8:30
Gottwald Conference Room D100

You're invited to learn about sustainability at a global, campus, and individual level. Get to know exactly what UR is doing to reduce waste, promote a healthy environment, conserve energy, and educate our campus. This will also be a time for you to ask any sustainability questions you may have. 

November 7: Unsettling Ecologies Lecture Series: Racial Climates

Hosted by the English Department, the Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies program, and the Environmental Studies program
November 7
4:30
Brown Alley Room, Weinstein Hall

Nancy Tuana
Dupont/Class of 1949 Professor of Philosophy and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, The Pennsylvania State University

The 2019-20 lecture series highlights some of the most provocative interdisciplinary work being done in the environmental humanities. The title of the series —Unsettling Ecologies—invites us to ask at least three questions:

1. How does a focus on ecology unsettle traditional ideas of personhood, politics, and ethical living?

2. How does mainstream ecological thought need to be unsettled by more radical ideas about how we may survive climate catastrophe?

3. How does thinking seriously about ecology require us to grapple with the colonial projects that animate almost all the pernicious environmental problems we face?

Learn more about the series

November 11: Eating Well for Yourself & the Environment

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability as part of International Education Week and the East Asia EcoChallenge
November 11
3:30-4:30
Wilton Center Multifaith Room

Learn about how our dietary choices shape the environment, the impact of food on our health, and how choosing certain foods can benefit the well-being of people and the planet from a panel of faculty experts and nonprofit leaders. 

November 11: Idealism and Realism in the Practice of Environmental Law

November 11
4:30
THC 348

Interested in practicing environmental law?  Please join us for a conversation with Cory Briggs, an attorney who practices environmental and public interest law in San Diego and the Inland Empire.  Over the past twenty years he has litigated dozens of environmental law cases, typically suing public actors (like the U.S. military or the City of San Diego) and private actors (like PG&E and Walmart) for violations of the California Environmental Quality Act, the Clean Air Act, and other state and federal statutes.

November 12: Practicing Mindfulness in Nature

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability as part of International Education Week and the East Asia EcoChallenge
November 12
8:30-9:30
Westhampton Lake Gazebo

Join us for a time to practice mindfulness in nature, inspired by shinrin-yoku. Shinrin-yoku, or “forest bathing”, is a practice developed in Japan in the 1980’s aimed at preventative health care and healing through calming, rejuvenating time in nature. Director of Sustainability Rob Andrejewski will lead the event at Westhampton Lake Gazebo on the morning of November 12. 

November 12: Race, Class, and Environmental Harm

Hosted by Sponsored by the Robert R. Merhige Jr. Center for Environmental Studies, Black Law Students Association, Richmond Environmental Law Society, & Richmond Public Interest Law Association
November 12
12:00-1:00
Law School Room 205

A discussion on environmental justice work in Virginia led by Director of Virginia Interfaith Power and Light Kendyl Crawford and Virginia Environmental Justice Collaborative Coordinator Queen Zakia Shabazz.

November 13: Solar Tour

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability as part of International Education Week and the East Asia EcoChallenge
November 13
10:30-11:30
Robins Center

Come learn about UR's on-campus solar array, how solar works, and what makes our array unique. 

November 13: Career Chat: Energy Efficiency on the Big Stage

Hosted by Career Services
November 13
2:30-3:15
Queally Center, Room 201

Zach Sussman graduated from the University of Richmond in 2010 with a BA in theater arts and business administration minor. After earning his MS in Environmental Policy and Sustainability Management from The New School and an MBA from NYU Stern, Zach returned to the city in which he was born and raised to work in the energy efficiency and sustainability industry with Con Edison as a Senior Specialist. With a unique path to his current role, Zach has had to learn how to find his place in an industry that can be very engineering-centric without a formal engineering education. Zach will be taking over the official @urichmondcareer Instagram page leading up to his chat to give you a real inside look at what he does on a daily basis. Learn more

November 14: GIS Day

Hosted by Geography & the Environment
November 14
10:30-3:30
Spatial Analysis Lab, Jepson 118
Learn More

The Spatial Analysis Lab will host GIS DAY this year on Thursday, November 14, 2019.  Join us for exciting student presentations and other activities.

International GIS Day is held each year in the third week of November, on the Wednesday during Geography Awareness Week, a geographic literacy initiative sponsored by the National Geographic Society. The department typically celebrates GIS Day with an open lab, software demonstrations, and speakers.

November 14: Invasive Species Removal at Huguenot Flatwater

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability as part of International Education Week and the East Asia EcoChallenge
November 14
2:30-4:00
Register here

As part of the Asia Week Eco-Challenge, we're going to spend a whole day focusing on water! As a way to learn about and care for the James River watershed, the Office for Sustainability is teaming up with the James River Park System to do some invasive plant removal at Huguenot Flatwater, just a couple miles from campus.

Invasive plants can prevent native plants from growing, and can ultimately affect the health of an ecosystem. By removing invasive species, we can contribute to the health of Huguenot Flatwater and native species living there. Transportation and gardening equipment will be provided.

November 14: Consider This: Spirituality & Sustainability

Hosted by the Office of the Chaplaincy
November 14
6:30-8:00
UR Downtown

A dinner series where participants gather to consider life's big questions, discussing spirituality, religion and what it means to live as people with or without a professed faith tradition. Faculty, staff, students, and alumni are invited to participate in each dinner. It is a time to be community, engage in meaningful conversation, and consider the beliefs and commitments at the heart of our work here at the University of Richmond.

November 15: Fall Clothing Swap

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability as part of International Education Week and the East Asia EcoChallenge
November 15
10:00-3:00
The Pier, Tyler Haynes Commons

Refresh your wardrobe at the Fall Clothing Swap! Donate gently used clothing in bins in your residence hall or apartment the week before, then come shop for free on the 15th. All leftover items will be donated to Goodwill after the event. 

November 15: Planting Party

Hosted by the Office of the Chaplaincy and the Office for Sustainability
November 15
2:00-3:00

Pick out a plant, decorate the pot, and practice some mindfulness as we come together to consider all that plants do for us and how we relate to nature. 

November 21: Community Dinner: The Business of Sustainability

Hosted by UR Downtown
November 21
5:30-6:30
UR Downtown

Community dinners Faiclitated by Joyce van der Laan Smith, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Business Programs, and Trey Sutton, Assistant Professor of Management. Community Dinners at UR Downtown bring together students, faculty, staff, and members of the greater Richmond community for meaningful conversation. 

January 19: Flint: The Poisoning of an American City

Hosted by the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement, Hands on Greater Richmond, Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities, and the Byrd Theatre and Foundation
January 19
1:00-4:00
The Byrd Theatre

Flint: The Poisoning of an American City (2019)" traces the timeline of Flint, Michigan's interaction with the Flint River – from the continued abuse and neglect of both city infrastructure and environmental regulations, to subsequent population decline, through today's crisis. This film is recommended for ages 13+.

This free movie screening will be followed by a short discussion with special guests. This event is in honor of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Day of Service. Learn more at https://www.handsonrva.org/mlkdayofservice.

January 20: Martin Luther King Jr. Day Service Events

Hosted by Common Ground and the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement
January 20
11:00-3:00
Learn More

Each year we invite students, staff, and faculty to join us for one of several opportunities to serve in the community and learn about civil rights in Richmond. The University also hosts an annual commemoration event featuring student performances and an inspirational keynote speaker. Campus community members can register to volunteer for work with Habitat for Humanity ReStore, Ancarrow's Landing Cleanup, the East End Cemetery Project and more. 

January 22: Live Well Dine Green: UR Honey

Hosted by Dining Services
January 22
11:30-2:00
Heilman Dining Center

Come get a taste of the honey produced by our campus hives.  

January 22: Conversation with UR Alum

Hosted by the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement
January 22
1:00-1:45
Tyler Haynes Commons, Think Tank

As a BMB major, Sarah Jean Larkins studied abroad in Peru, Argentina, New Zealand and Turks & Caicos. After graduating from UR, she did a Peace Corps adventure in the Philippines on coral reef and coastal management, conservation and restoration. She then earned a Masters of Science (MS) in Environmental Studies at the College of Charleston before starting work at TekMountain, which is something of a think-tank in Wilmington, NC.

Anyone and everyone is welcome to join.

January 23: Udall Information Session

Hosted by the Office of Scholars and Fellowships
January 23
4:00-5:00
Tyler Haynes Commons 321

The Udall Foundation awards scholarships to college sophomores and juniors for leadership, public service, and commitment to issues related to Native American nations or to the environment. Learn more about the scholarship.

January 29: Eco-Corridor Student Mini-Symposium

Hosted by the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement
January 29
4:30-6:00
Weinstein Hall, Brown-Alley Room
RSVP Required

The senior environmental study and geography students used the eco-corridor as the theme for their capstone projects in the fall. Join us to hear brief presentations about their research, followed by a short keynote presentation by our librarian Dywana Saunders based on historical information she has gathered at the site.

Food and conversation about future eco-corridor research to follow.

Email bjezouit@richmond.edu or tlooking@richmond.edu if you have questions or would like to learn more about this event.

January 29: Allison Miller's Boom Tic Boom, "In Our Veins: Rivers and Social Change"

Hosted by the Modlin Center for the Arts
January 29
7:30-10:00
Camp Concert Hall

Described by critics as a charismatic and rhythmically propulsive drummer with melodic sensibility, Allison Miller engages her deep roots in jazz improvisation as a way to explore all music. The critically acclaimed percussionist and Yamaha clinician will be joined by her stellar band, Boom Tic Boom, for the Richmond premiere of her new Modlin Center for the Arts co-commissioned work, In Our Veins: Rivers and Social Change.

Rivers are the lifeline of America. In Our Veins: Rivers and Social Change is a multimedia suite for chamber jazz ensemble and tap dancer centered around five American rivers (Susquehanna, Delaware, James, Hudson, Schuylkill) and the social and environmental changes they inspired. Learn more and get tickets

February 5: Global Environment Speaker Series: The largest dam removal in the world

Hosted by Department of Geography & the Environment, the Environmental Studies Program and Global Studies Program
February 5
10:30
Robins School of Business, BUS 225

Vivian Leung
Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Richmond
"The largest dam removal in the world: The Elwha River Restoration project, wood debris, deltas, and habitat"

February 7: CCE Brown Bag: Meet the East Coast Greenway: Connecting People to Place

Hosted by the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement
February 7
12:30-1:25
Wilton Center Multifaith Room

The Bonner Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) hosts weekly Brown Bag discussions, open to members of the campus and the community, from 12:30–1:25p.m. on most Fridays during the academic year. Each week, a speaker or small panel leads a presentation on a provocative social issue, then opens up the floor for discussion. Free pizza will be provided.

Sarah Sanford, North Carolina & Virginia Coordinator for the East Coast Greenway, will share the vision, utility, and future of the walking/biking route, which runs through Richmond at Belle Isle.

February 7: ChinaFest Film Screening: Born in China

Hosted by Boatwright Memorial Library
February 7
7:30
Robins School of Business Ukrop Auditorium

From frigid mountains to the heart of the bamboo forest, this film follows the adventures of three animal families in China: the majestic panda, the savvy golden monkey and the elusive snow leopard. Featuring stunning imagery, and showcasing intimate family moments, never before captured.

Learn more about ChinaFest.

February 10: RVA Environmental Film Festival: Drowning in Plastic

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability
February 10
5:00-6:00: Tabling and Snacks
6:00-7:30: Film Screening
Robins School of Business Ukrop Auditorium

As part of the annual RVA Environmental Film Festival, University of Richmond will be screening the documentary "Drowning in Plastic". This film takes viewers around the world as biologist and broadcaster Liz Bonin explores the full scale of the world's plastic problem. Watch the trailer here.

February 11: Environmental Justice Dinner & Discussion

Hosted by the Multifaith Student Council
February 11

7:00
Wilton Center Multifaith Room

Students are invited to join the Multifaith Student Council for dinner and a discussion on environmental justice.

February 12: Tu'Bishvat Planting Party

Hosted by Hillel, the Office of the Chaplaincy, and the Office for Sustainability
February 12

7:30
Wilton Center 

Join Hillel to celebrate Tu'Bishvat, the celebration of trees, with a planting party! 

February 13: Unsettling Ecologies: "This land is our land"

Hosted by the English Department, the Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies program, and the Environmental Studies program
February 13
5:00

‘This land is our land’: Private property, settler colonialism, and the affective territories of populism in pipeline opposition movements

Kai Bosworth
Assistant Professor of World Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University

The 2019-20 lecture series highlights some of the most provocative interdisciplinary work being done in the environmental humanities. The title of the series —Unsettling Ecologies—invites us to ask at least three questions:

1. How does a focus on ecology unsettle traditional ideas of personhood, politics, and ethical living?

2. How does mainstream ecological thought need to be unsettled by more radical ideas about how we may survive climate catastrophe?

3. How does thinking seriously about ecology require us to grapple with the colonial projects that animate almost all the pernicious environmental problems we face?

Learn more about the series

February 13: Intro to Sustainability

Hosted by URSA and the Office for Sustainability
February 23
7:00-8:00
THC 346

You're invited to learn about sustainability at a global, campus, and individual level. Get to know exactly what UR is doing to reduce waste, promote a healthy environment, conserve energy, and educate our campus. This will also be a time for you to ask any sustainability questions you may have. 

February 18: GRTC Town Hall

Hosted by the Transportation Services
February 18
3:00
Westhampton Room, Heilman Dining Center

Transportation Services is excited to continue our partnership with GRTC and invite you to attend a Town Hall meeting on Tuesday, February 18 at 3pm in the Westhampton Room of the Heilman Dining Center.  Carrie Rose, GRTC Director of Communications, will discuss the proposed changes to GRTC Bus routes 75 and 77. GRTC is looking to make a change to these routes on May 20, 2020 and is providing this opportunity for us to give feedback on the changes.

For more information about the changes and to complete an online survey about the changes, go to the GRTC website via this link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QJY5Q8V. If you cannot attend, please feel free to send your comments to our transportation inbox, Transportation@richmond.edu and we will forward those to GRTC.

February 18: Global Environment Speaker Series: Putting climate change in context: reconstructing the history of Earth's climate with seafloor sediments"

Hosted by the Environmental Studies Program
February 18
4:30

Samantha Bova
L'Oreal For Women in Science Postdoctoral Fellow, Rutgers University
"Putting climate change in context: reconstructing the history of Earth's climate with seafloor sediments”

February 19: RecycleMania Basketball Game

Hosted by Athletics and the Office for Sustainability
February 19
6:00
Robins Center

On February 19, University of Richmond will host its fourth annual RecycleMania basketball game. This event is a big part of our participation in RecycleMania, a nationwide recycling competition. Many concessions at this game will be recyclable or compostable. Our goal is to send as little waste as possible to the landfill from this game.

We will need volunteers throughout the Robins Center from 6:00 until the end of the game to educate people about which bin their waste will go in. All volunteers will receive a t-shirt. Sign up to volunteer here.

February 20: Contemplative Ecology

Hosted by the Office of the Chaplaincy
February 20
7:00
Alice Haynes Room, Tyler Haynes Commons

The Office of the Chaplaincy invites you to save the date for the the next lecture in our Sylvester Spirituality Series. Fred Bahnson of Wake Forest University School of Divinity will join us on February 20, 2020 as we consider "Contemplative Ecology: Cultivating a Spirituality for the Climate Crisis." We will gather at 7 p.m. in the Alice Haynes Room of Tyler Haynes Commons to discuss how we foster a wholistic, action oriented spirituality amidst the reality of climate change. A dessert reception will follow.

February 20: Plate to Planet Interest Meeting

Hosted by Plate to Planet
February 20
7:00
THC 340

Join the first meeting of Plate to Planet, a club for students interested in plant-based eating. Snacks will be provided and all are welcome.

February 21: CCE Brown Bag: A Conversation with Fred Bahnson

Hosted by the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement
February 21
12:30-1:25
Wilton Center, Multifaith Room

The Bonner Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) hosts weekly Brown Bag discussions, open to members of the campus and the community, from 12:30–1:25p.m. on most Fridays during the academic year. Each week, a speaker or small panel leads a presentation on a provocative social issue, then opens up the floor for discussion. Free pizza will be provided.

This Brown Bag Discussion will welcome Fred Bahnson, Sylvester Spirituality Lecturer and Director of the Food, Health, and Ecological Well-Being Program and Assistant Professor of the Practice of Ecological Well-Being at the Wake Forest University School of Divinity. Bahnson’s discussion will include reflections on spirituality and sustainability.

February 25: Social Entrepreneurship: In Theory and In Practice

Hosted by the Creativity, Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
February 25
4:30-6:00
Brown Alley Room, Weinstein Hall

Dr. Bala Mulloth holds a PhD in Technology Management from New York University Tandon School of Engineering. He is a globally oriented educator who has lived and worked in Asia, Europe and North America. His focus areas are innovation and social entrepreneurship and he is currently an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the University of Virginia's Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. Dr. Mulloth is also the Co-Founder and CEO of Hava, a materials science venture that creates advanced fabrics that help people breathe clean air. In addition to these roles, he is a Research Fellow at the U. S Army Research Laboratory.

Dr. Mulloth’s previous work experience in the area of CIE includes: Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management at Central European University (CEU) in Budapest, Hungary and the Program Director of CEU’s experiential New York City MBA program; a Visiting Faculty Fellow at the National Defense University; and the Senior Manager of New York University Tandon School of Engineering’s Office of Innovation Development, Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship.

February 27: Global Environment Speaker Series: "Nuclear Power: Climate Savior or Foe?"

Hosted by the Environmental Studies Program
February 27
4:30
Gottwald Auditorium

Greg Jaczko
Former Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) commissioner and chairman
"Nuclear Power: Climate Savior or Foe?"

March 3: Navigator Cool: Indigenous Leadership with Traditional Seafaring and Ecological Knowledge from Oceania

Hosted by the Jepson School of Leadership Studies
March 3
3:00
Jepson Hall, 118

Dr. Vicente Diaz heads the Native Canoe Program at the Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

The program uses indigenous watercraft and traditional ecological knowledge about water in Oceania, the Native Great Lakes region, and the upper MIssissippi River for community-engaged research and teaching purposes and to advance indigenous peoplehood and nation-building.

Refreshments will be provided. Advance registration is required. Register here.

March 4: Should nature have legal rights?

Hosted by the Robert R. Merhige Jr. Center for Environmental Studies and the Richmond Environmental Law Society
March 4
12:00-1:00
Law School 114

Join Tish O’Dell to learn more about the Lake Erie Bill of Rights, a charter amendment enacted by voters of Toledo in early 2019. O’Dell works with the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDF) to develop “first in the nation” local laws banning fracking, factory farming, water privatization, and promoting workers’ rights and the rights of nature. As a leading advocate for the Lake Erie Bill of Rights, she’ll share how she has been fighting to protect it from federal and state challenges.

Lunch will be served, but please bring your own drink.

March 20: Finders Keepers: Free Secondhand Shopping

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability
March 20
10:00-2:00
Tyler Haynes Commons, the Pier

Refresh your wardrobe with some free shopping from a wide selection of sendhand items! Donate gently used clothing in bins in your residence hall or apartment the week before, then come shop for free on the 20th. All leftover items will be donated to Goodwill after the event. 

March 23: Science Careers Under the Microscope

March 23
6:00-8:30
Gottwald Science Center Auditorium A001

Through panel discussions and informal networking, University of Richmond alumni who studied Biology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Studies, Geography, Physics, and related areas will share their career paths and how you can get started in the industries they represent.

March 28-29: 2020 Merhige Environmental Negotiation Competition

Hosted by the Robert R. Merhige Jr. Center for Environmental Studies and the University of Richmond Client Counseling Negotiation Board
March 28-29
9:00-3:00
School of Law

The Robert R. Merhige, Jr. National Environmental Negotiation Competition, sponsored by the University of Richmond Client Counseling Negotiation Board, honors the legacy of the late United States District Court Judge.

A maximum of two teams per school will be permitted. The registration fee is $450 per team, which includes breakfast both days, lunch on Saturday, and a reception following the final round.

Registration to open on Tuesday, January 28, 2020.
Contact: Chandler Huffer

April 3: Earth Day Art Build

Hosted by the Department of Geography and the Environment
April 3
3:00-5:00

Form a team to create an original sculpture with recyclable and recovered materials in celebration of Earth Day. The sculptures will be judged by a panel of University of Richmond faculty and staff. 
 
Requirements:  
 
Each team will need to designate a team captain who will organize the team’s efforts and communicate with the event organizers. Every member of the team must bring to the Art Build five recyclable items and five items that would otherwise go into a landfill. There will be a communal material pile that includes some necessities (rope, glue, etc.) to draw upon as well. Each team captain will choose a theme for their build from a list provided. Nothing can be purchased! Everything must be saved from the landfill or recycling. 

April 10: Unsettling Ecologies: From Insurgency to Adaptation

Hosted by the English Department, the Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies program, and the Environmental Studies program
April 10
5:00

From Insurgency to Adaptation: Bangladesh and the Figure of the Climate Refugee

Neel Ahuja
Associate Professor of Feminist Studies, University of California Santa Cruz

The 2019-20 lecture series highlights some of the most provocative interdisciplinary work being done in the environmental humanities. The title of the series —Unsettling Ecologies—invites us to ask at least three questions:

1. How does a focus on ecology unsettle traditional ideas of personhood, politics, and ethical living?

2. How does mainstream ecological thought need to be unsettled by more radical ideas about how we may survive climate catastrophe?

3. How does thinking seriously about ecology require us to grapple with the colonial projects that animate almost all the pernicious environmental problems we face?

Learn more about the series

April 13: Sustainability Banquet

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability
April 13
6:00-7:30
Alice Haynes Room

You're invited to join us to share a meal, celebrate the year's sustainability accomplishments, and recognize Sustainability Leadership Award winners. Registration for the event and award nominations will open in March.

April 14: Gambles Mill Eco-Corridor Grand Opening

Hosted by the Office for Sustainability
April 14
10:00-11:00
Gambles Mill Eco-Corridor, across from 122 UR Drive


You're invited to celebrate the grand opening of the Gambles Mill Eco-Corridor. After more than two years of stream restoration, invasive species management, community garden renovation, and trail construction, this space is ready to provide outdoor learning and recreational opportunities. President Ronald A. Crutcher will speak on the exceptional improvements made in the area and students will guide attendees on a tour of the Eco-Corridor. 

Learn more about the Eco-Corridor.

April 18: Eighth Blackbird, "Transient Landscapes"

Hosted by the Modlin Center
April 18
3:00-5:00
Byrd Park


Fossil fuels deep in the earth become atmosphere, a glacier becomes floodwater in a basement on the other side of the world, coasts become the sea, and the sea becomes plastic. We live in an era of transient landscapes. Through creative sound art and ecoacoustics, the Transient Landscapes project connects the human imagination to the environment. Percussionist Matthew Duvall and ecoacoustician/composer Matthew Burtner lead a collective including ensemble-in-residence Eighth Blackbird, Chicago-based percussion ensemble beyond this point, and a contingent of local volunteers to combine the ephemeral presence of sound with the material quality of a glacier to create a large-scale live and interactive performance installation.

Free

Location: Byrd Park, 600 South Arthur Ashe Boulevard, Richmond, VA 23220 (near Virginia War Memorial Carillon) 
Parking is available at Dogwood Dell Amphitheater parking lot. Signage and volunteers will guide you to the performance location behind the Virginia War Memorial Carillon.

April 22: Reclaiming This Ground: Honoring the History and Community of East End Cemetery

Hosted by the School of Arts and Sciences
April 22
6:30-8:30
Peter Paul Development Center
1708 N 22nd St, Richmond, VA 23223


East End Cemetery was founded in 1897 by prominent black Richmonders who were excluded from cemeteries established for the white population, such as Hollywood. As with other African American burial grounds of the period, plots were maintained primarily by families. However, the weight of Jim Crow’s racially discriminatory policies, the lack of public investment, and the displacement of many African American communities took a heavy toll on East End. By the 1970s, it was almost completely overgrown, and at some point the paper burial records were lost. Since 2013, volunteers have been working to clear vegetation, uncover grave markers, and piece together the history of the community at rest in the cemetery. UR and VCU students and faculty have participated in this effort since 2017.

This event brings together students, faculty, and community members to honor the people buried at East End Cemetery through commemorative acts, oral history videos, maps, presentations of research (historical, archaeological, and demographic), and a collaborative art project (cyanotype quilt).

Agenda
6:00 - 6:40 pm: Welcome
6:40 - 7:00 pm: Commemorative act by DANC 319 Collaborative Arts Lab: Dance, Humanities, and Technology
7:00 - 7:20 pm: Oral history presentations (Friends of East End oral history project)
7:20 - 7:30 pm: Introduce/present cyanotype quilt (Oakwood Arts) 
7:30 - 8:15 pm: Presentations of student work (other Collaboratory classes)
8:15 - 8:30 pm: Discussion